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The best web sites are from the Federal Drug Administration and are as follows: 

http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/breastimplants/

http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2004/504_implants.html

 

http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/breastimplants/breast_implant_risks_brochure.html

http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/breastimplants/labeling/mentor_patient_labeling_5900.html

http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/breastimplants/labeling/inamed_patient_labeling_5900.html

 

Also, in the past these sites were posted by the fda, but may not open: 

1. http://www.fda.gov/oca/hotopics.htm

2. http://www.fda.gov/oca/breastimplants/bitac.html

3. http://content.health.msn.com/content/dmk/dmk_article_5962883  

4.  www.fda.gov/cdrh/breastimplants/indexbip.html

Scientific American Sept 1999

SILICONE SAFE

A major report finds that silicone breast
implants don't lead to cancer


Women who have silicone breast implants are no more likely than the rest of the population to develop cancer, immunological diseases or neurological disorders, a committee of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) reported on June 21. Moreover, mothers with implants may safely breast-feed their infants, as there is no evidence of toxicity in the milk. The IOM committee drew its conclusions after holding public hearings (during which women with implants told of their experiences) and reviewing scientific literature on silicone breast implants (first made in 1962) and silicone.

The analysis--funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases--is the latest in a series to have found such results. Similar announcements were made last year by scientists who were appointed by judges overseeing implant liability litigation in the U.S. and by researchers in Britain reviewing implant safety for the British Department of Health.

Still, the IOM committee points out, breast implants are not without risks. The tissue around the implants may contract, causing pain and disfigurement and leading to infection by skin bacteria that normally reside in the lactiferous ducts of a healthy breast. Also, implants have a finite life span, and rupture rates of gel implants and the deflation frequencies of current saline models have not been determined. Problems lead to additional surgery to replace or remove them.

Not everyone is convinced by the IOM report. Some believe that a study based on other studies--called a meta-analysis--is inherently flawed because of assumptions made about the quality of previous research. In any case, implant manufacturers have already agreed to a total settlement estimated at $4 billion with plaintiffs who claimed physical harm; now-bankrupt Dow Corning will be paying the most, some $3.2 billion.


--Christina Reed

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  1984-2014 American Society of Cosmetic Breast Surgery  Last modified: March 28, 2014